Lifestyles
American paddlefish and alligator gar focus of Second Saturday at Hagerman
By Friends of Hagarman National Wildlife Refuge
Jul 12, 2019
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Second Saturday:  American Paddlefish and Alligator Gar
Saturday, July 13, 10:00 11:30 a.m.

Biologists Sarah Spangler and Krissy Sardina from the Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery will be presenting on the ecology, history, and status of the American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) and alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) in the United States, focusing on their roles as fish biologists in the conservation of the two species.

Sarah Spangler is a fish biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service stationed out of Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery in Tishomingo, Oklahoma. She grew up exploring the spring fed streams of Missouri and Northwest Arkansas, which led to a passion of the natural world and the pursuance of a degree in Wildlife Biology. After exploring different careers, which included working as a marine mammal observer in Oregon and an electrofishing crew member in Virginia, she decided to pursue a masters degree from Missouri State University in 2016. During her graduate studies she partnered with Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery, studying the ecology of hatchling alligator snapping turtles. Since her graduation, she has begun working full-time at Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery as a biologist, where she has the privilege of working with several threatened and endangered species, such as the American paddlefish, alligator snapping turtle, and Arkansas River shiner.

Krissy Sardina is a Fisheries Biologist at Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery where she works with species such as American paddlefish, alligator gar, channel catfish, and alligator snapping turtles. She earned her B.S. in Biology from Florida Gulf Coast University in 2016 and her M.S. in Biology at Missouri State University in 2019 with research conducted on head-starting practices of alligator snapping turtles.  Originally from southwest Florida, Krissy developed her passion for aquatic biology and conservation through her early explorations of coastal ecosystems and cypress swamps.