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Who gets Alzheimer’s?
By Scott Finley, Alzheimer’s Association® in Texas
Oct 18, 2020
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Since March we’ve heard an awful lot about COVID-19.   Where it started, who’s at greatest risk and how it spreads.

Also in March, a new survey of primary care physicians appearing in the Alzheimer’s Association 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report finds nearly 9 in 10 primary care physicians expect to see an increase in people living with dementia in the next five years.

Worldwide, 50 million people – including over 5 million Americans and 400,000 plus Texans -- are living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.  Alzheimer’s is a degenerative brain disease and is the most common form of dementia.  It is not a normal process of aging.

1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  It kills more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.

Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women.

Based on data for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older, it’s estimated that Alzheimer’s or another dementia has been diagnosed in 10.3% of whites, 12.2% of Hispanics/Latinos and 13.8% of Blacks/African Americans.

Early onset Alzheimer’s can strike people as young as their 30’s or 40’s.

As of this writing, there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease.  However, early diagnosis and treatment can lead to better quality of life. 

Reaching out to help those living with Alzheimer’s disease and the people who are their caregivers is a large part of what the Alzheimer’s Association is all about.   As the world’s largest non-profit dedicated to ending Alzheimer’s and other dementias, we depend on you for assistance. 

There is always room for you to help by volunteering, or by joining one of the Texas Walks to End Alzheimer’s.   You can always watch one of the opening ceremonies on line and then do your own walk, wherever you are!

To find one in your area go to www.alz.org/walk

And just a reminder – you can always get the latest information about the Association’s COVID-19 emergency preparedness guidelines for Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers in long-term or community-based care settings here: https://alz.org/professionals/professional-providers/coronavirus-covid-19-tips-for-dementia-caregivers

The Alzheimer’s Association leads the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia – by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's and all other dementia. Visit alz.org or call 800.272.3900.

Scott Finley is Media Relations Manager for the Alzheimer’s Association® in Texas.  He can be reached at scfinley@alz.org