Columnists
  • Many people who use computers today talk about cut and paste, but years ago when I entered first grade cut and paste required some small blunt scissors and a bottle of paste. Basically today's cut and paste is a process on the computer or smartphone where you can copy a picture or text and make that part of a new document you are putting together. It's a totally different procedure from the way I learned when scissors and a bottle of paste were actually used.
  • Real or artificial Christmas tree decorated with lights, ornaments, and tinsel? Which is the right choice? It depends on switch side of the aluminum or wooden fence you are on. Ho-ho-holarious.
  • Nov. 30 marks the end of this year's hurricane season, and the amount of destruction caused has been enormous. In addition to 65 deaths in the Bahamas (Hurricane Dorian), repairing the property damage from all the year'' hurricanes will cost many billions of dollars.
  • The summer of 1980 was a character builder. If you were around then, I'm sure you remember it well. One hundred plus days with one hundred plus temperatures. The heat index went through the roof.
  • We must never forget that the most important part of every December is not shopping; it's to observe and celebrate the birth of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It's been said that Jesus is the reason for the season. In reality he's the reason for any season. While there will be lots of sales and bargains galore this month, but those things should be way down the list from the real reason we celebrate December 25 every year. A few years ago a friend sent me an e-mail wishing me a Merry CHRISTmas, written that way we surely shouldn't forget the true meaning of what CHRISTmas is all about.
  • Solipsism believes that only a person's mind is certain to exist: more related to philosophy. Originating from the Latin "solus"(only) and "ipsis" (self), the ‘solipsis syndrome’ in psychology states that reality exists only in one’s mind.
  • Sue Shellenbarger, who is a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal, recently wrote about a subject that is dear to my heart. She observed that telling family stories about crazy Uncle Joe or other eccentric relatives is a favorite pastime when families gather for the holidays. Then she went on to cite evidence that this form of reminiscing has significant benefits.
  • "Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds you plant." -- Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Socrates, Aristotle, and other lesser known ancient Greeks would not be surprised. Greek families who could afford slaves appointed one to be the accompanier of their child to school.
  • For the sake of introduction, Aunt Jack and Uncle Edward owned a grocery store in Dodd City.
  • Thomas Edison has always been something of an enigma to me. I remember the first time I read about him and his incredible number and range of inventions. His more than 1,000 patents included talking pictures; singing dolls; phonograph records; stock tickers; and a forerunner of the tattoo gun. I found no explanation for what enabled him to be so imaginative and prolific. However, there's a new biography by Edmund Morris that provides greater insight.
  • Sgt. Noah Galloway is an Army veteran who was badly wounded in Iraq while driving a Humvee. Sgt. Galloway lost his left arm above the elbow and his right leg above the knee in an explosion. Galloway is now a fitness expert and motivational speaker who travels the country, encouraging others to offer no excuses. In fact he was a contestant in 2015 on Season 20 of Dancing With the Stars, finishing in third place.