Farm and Ranch
  • The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has published online the 2018 Texas Agricultural Custom Rates survey of regional and state rates charged for custom agricultural operations. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)
  • A new Council of Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) paper, authored by a task force of university and government researchers, explores the long-term impact of aquifer depletion on U.S. agriculture, suggesting that increased competition for the use of water from aquifers may negatively affect future agricultural practices in drier regions of the United States.
  • An experimental field in College Station where outcrossings between sorghum and johnsongrass are studied by the Texas A&M AgriLife Research team. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Dr. Muthu Bagavathiannan)
  • "It is time to make sure your forage pastures are in the best condition they can be," said Justin Rogers, AgriLife Extension agriculture and natural resources agent for Young County. "We are bringing in experts to update us on weed control, nutrient management and the newly introduced Chisholm tall fescue, which is a cool-season perennial alternative to winter wheat."
  • Tall fescue is a cool-season perennial forage that can provide valuable forage from fall through spring for grazing livestock. Tall fescue generally needs at least 37 inches or more of annual rainfall for suitable production and persistence. Historically, in Oklahoma and Texas, this type of rainfall occurs east of Interstate 35.
  • Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will host two one-day grain-grading workshops on April 23-24 at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, 6500 W. Amarillo Blvd., Amarillo.
  • Animal science researchers with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will be testing a virtual fence for cows and other livestock this summer. It's akin to an invisible fence for a dog, triggering a harmless but attention-getting shock if the animal crosses an unseen boundary.
  • As the nation's cattle inventory continues its expansion, consumer demand is increasing at a steady clip, according to experts speaking at the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association Convention in Fort Worth.
  • The use of conservation easements could bring more than $5.8 million per year in value to wildlife. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo)
  • USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is now accepting applications for the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP). The ACEP, reauthorized through the 2018 Farm Bill, funds easements for agricultural lands and wetlands.
  • The Texas Well Owner Network will present several well water screening opportunities in different North Texas counties. (photo courtesy Texas Well Owner Network)
  • Texas A&M AgriLife Extension is starting a new program series aimed towards helping new landowners in Collin County. This will be a 5-workshop program occurring from April through August covering topics including property taxes, livestock management, brush control, and property upkeep. The first session on Friday, April 12 at 8:00 a.m. in Myers Park in McKinney will introduce landowners to some of the agencies in Collin County that provide loans, cost-share programs, or technical assistance for their operations. Additionally, the class will also have speakers present on how to maintain a property’s Ag valuation (or ag exemption), and how to get a wildlife valuation for the property.